Intersections: Duets with Nature

Humpback Whale by Christopher Michel

Humpback Whale by Christopher Michel is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Landscape Music isn’t really a publication for conventional music journalism, but interesting projects frequently come to my attention that are well worth mentioning here. Accordingly, I bring you Intersections: a series of articles highlighting large-scale, interdisciplinary, multimedia, and/or collaborative projects at the intersection of music, nature, and environmental advocacy. These articles will profile groups of diverse projects that share compelling thematic connections.

Each of these projects provide new and illuminating answers to the question of how we can make music about, with, and from natural landscapes (or, as the case may be, seascapes!). And all of the work I’ll be exploring is closely aligned with the ideas behind this website, though these artists are not affiliated with Landscape Music or the Landscape Music Composers Network.

For this first article, I’m focusing on a few unusual projects in which new music is created through a “duet” with sounds from the natural world: POD TUNE, an ambient album featuring whale song; E-Mago, music made with geophysical data; Inuksuit, John Luther Adam’s outdoors epic; and Nat Evans’ The Tortoise, a sonic documentation of the Pacific Crest Trail. Continue reading

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Stephen Wood: Wilderness Advocacy Through Music and Education

Photographs from the 2014 Wilderness Act Performance Series at the Outdoor Activity Center in Atlanta, GA. Proximity to Nature by Shawn Taylor and Proximity Viz, LLC. Left to right, middle: Stephen Wood, composer/director; Marti Keller, poet. Bottom: Tim Crump, saxophone; Jessica Sherer, flute; Nick Johns, piano/Corey Denham, percussion; Eric Fontaine, saxophone.

Photographs from the 2014 Wilderness Act Performance Series at the Outdoor Activity Center in Atlanta, GA. Proximity to Nature by Shawn Taylor and Proximity Viz, LLC. Left to right, middle: Stephen Wood, composer/director; Marti Keller, poet. Bottom: Tim Crump, saxophone; Jessica Sherer, flute; Nick Johns, piano/Corey Denham, percussion; Eric Fontaine, saxophone.

Stephen Wood is an Atlanta-based composer, performer, and naturalist who creates classical and jazz music in conversation with wilderness advocacy and environmental education.

Stephen Wood in Nantahala Wilderness Area.

Stephen Wood in Southern Nantahala Wilderness Area.

I asked Stephen, who is a member of the Landscape Music Composers Network, to share some of the ideas and experiences behind his innovative concerts and educational programs, in particular, and to elucidate his vision of how music acts as a catalyst for reconnecting us to our environment.

Stephen writes: “My current work as a composer, educator, and environmentalist is concerned with advocating for our National Preservation System and awakening our human connection to Earth. I do this first by composing music in different genres inspired by these natural themes. Additionally, I participate in and create Artist Residencies for our National Wilderness Preservation System, producing site-specific concerts and “Art Hikes” celebrating human connections to Nature, and presenting my educational workshop “Inspiring Stewardship” in music and science classes.” Continue reading

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Concert Preview: New Music of Our National Parks

Linda Chase performs on the rim, August 2012. Photo by Autumn Chase-Dempsey.

Linda Chase performs on the rim of the Grand Canyon, August 2012. Photo by Autumn Chase-Dempsey.

This Spring, the epic landscapes of Zion, Grand Canyon, and Yosemite will be brought to life in Boston. New Music of Our National Parks is a concert of new chamber music inspired by nature, honoring the national parks in the centennial year of the National Park Service. I’m delighted to be involved with this project, produced by Rachel Panitch in affiliation with the Landscape Music Composers Network.

The concert, which will take place on Friday, April 15, 2016 at 8:00pm on the monthly Advent Library Concert Series at The Church of the Advent in the heart of historic Beacon Hill, Boston (suggested donation is $10), brings together works by three members of the Composers Network—Rachel, Linda Chase, and myself—and features performances by Cardamom Quartet, vocalist Burcu Gulec, flutist Alicia Mielke, guitarist Devin Ulibarri, and the vibraphone/violins trio Thread Ensemble.

I’ve previously posted a brief announcement and a press release about the event. Below, I dig a bit deeper into the works featured on the program and explore how each of the composers drew inspiration from national parks. Continue reading

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This April in Boston, Landscape Music Composers Pay Tribute to National Parks

The Watchman, Zion National Park - Flickr - Joe Parks

New Music of Our National Parks
Presented in affiliation with the Landscape Music Composers Network

April 15, 2016, 8:00pm
Advent Library Concert Series
The Church of the Advent
30 Brimmer St (corner of Brimmer and Mount Vernon)
Boston, MA 02108
$10 suggested donation

Rachel Panitch has joined forces with Linda Chase and myself to present the first-ever concert of music by members of the Landscape Music Composers Network!

New Music of Our National Parks will feature new chamber music inspired by National Parks. Several of these works emerged from Rachel’s residency at Zion National Park, which she discussed with me at length in an interview for Landscape Music, as well as Linda’s residency at Grand Canyon. My own piece, Dai-Shizen (Great Nature), is a reflection on the Yosemite-inspired artworks of Chiura Obata and how he carried this inspiration with him to the internment camp where he was imprisoned during World War II.

The program will be performed by Boston-based string quartet, Cardamom Quartet, vibraphone and violins trio Thread Ensemble, vocalist Burcu Gulec, and the flute and guitar duo of Alicia Mielke and Devin Ulibarri, and presented as part of the monthly Advent Library Concert Series in the heart of historic Beacon Hill, Boston.

Stay tuned for more in-depth coverage of this event on this website, including explorations of the pieces featured on this exciting program. Read the full press release.

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What’s New? Winter 2016

Ryan Suleiman and Jenni Brandon Join the Composers Network

I’m delighted to welcome two excellent composers from California to the Landscape Music Composers Network!

Jenni BrandonJenni Brandon creates imaginative evocations of our experiences of nature, from woodwind meditations on driftwood and sea glass to a song cycle setting of North American Indian ceremonial texts. Her many works inspired by nature include her CD, Songs of California: Music for Winds and Piano.

Ryan SuleimanRyan Suleiman channels the sublime wonder of natural phenomena, from salt flats to moonlight, into his music for solo instruments and chamber ensembles. With his music, Ryan seeks to inspire respect for the majesty of the natural world amidst the crisis of climate change.

 


Landscape Music on NewMusicBox

I was invited to write a series of guest columns for NewMusicBox in November and December. Two of these columns focused on Landscape Music, so I’d like to share them here!

Why Landscape Music is More Important Than Ever – The intrinsic power of music to facilitate reflection and reinterpretation of life experiences makes creating Landscape Music a compelling approach to improving and deepening our connection to nature—a goal which is more important now than ever.

How Landscape Music Evokes the Natural World – What is the role of nature in culture? Why use the term “landscape” in reference to music? How can music symbolize the natural world? What are some of the specific approaches composers have taken to creating landscapes in their music?

 

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What’s New? Fall 2015

There’s been some exciting behind-the-scenes activity going on here at Landscape Music over the last few months, but the website has been deceptively quiet! So, I thought I’d share a few updates:

Concerts in 2016

The first-ever Landscape Music Composers Network concerts are in the works for Spring and Fall of 2016 in Boston and New York, respectively, with two different programs featuring music by members of the Composers Network. These events will commemorate the centennial of the National Park Service with new music celebrating National Parks. We’re partnering with some fantastic performers and venues to bring this to life. Watch this space and follow me on Twitter for announcements in the coming months.

Justin RallsJustin Ralls Joins the Composers Network

Justin Ralls, a composer based in Portland, OR, is deeply inspired by wilderness: from his opera dramatizing the meeting of Muir and Roosevelt to his vivid works for chamber ensembles responding to natural soundscapes. Learn more on Justin’s LM profile, then check out the rest of the Composers Network roster.

Cohen_Nell_Tools_of_the_Trade_2015_edited

Tools of the Trade. Photo by Nell Shaw Cohen.

Nell writes for NewMusicBox

I’m honored to have been invited to contribute six articles to NewMusicBox (where my writing energies are being temporarily diverted!). The first of these articles was published today: it introduces my four-part series on new music for learning, which will explore the learning potential of music inspired by visual art as well as Landscape Music. Follow NewMusicBox on Twitter and Facebook for announcements as these articles are published.

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Evoking Place through Music: Three Modes of Expression

Wanderlust

Wanderlust. By Nell Shaw Cohen, 2015.

The question of how composers evoke place through music is one that could fill a book, or several of them. At the risk of taking a cursory approach to the subject, I’d like to propose three “modes of expression” that composers have utilized to this end: 1) music as aesthetic response to place; 2) imitation of place-based sound; and 3) allusion to place-associated music and musical styles. I’ll then consider some examples of how three prominent place-inspired composers—Charles Ives, Olivier Messiaen, and John Luther Adams—took these approaches in their work.

The modes I’ve identified are inherently broad and very fluid: as we will see, composers and even individual works may combine them. That said, I perceive these three distinct approaches in many pieces of music—and I can’t think of any example of music strongly evoking place that doesn’t utilize at least one of them.
Continue reading

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The ecocentric rationale for wilderness

Wilderness and the American Mind by Roderick Frazier NashI recently read Wilderness and the American Mind, Roderick Frazier Nash‘s influential landmark survey of the intellectual history of wilderness in the U.S. In the Epilogue of the fourth edition, Nash muses on possible futures for wilderness and explains why the attitudes and rationales that led to the preservation of wilderness in the past may not hold up going forward.

Ecocentric” arguments for wilderness preservation, which are rooted in ethics—rather than aesthetics, politics, or economics—are becoming increasingly important. Such a shift in conversation necessitates an intellectual and moral transformation of attitudes about nature. This is something I’ve been thinking about for a while, and Nash’s ideas have stimulated me to further contemplate how music might support the ecocentric perspective. Continue reading

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Stephen Lias, Adventurer-Composer

Stephen Lias

Stephen Lias. Source.

Stephen Lias is an accomplished and inspirational composer of music for orchestra and large ensembles, chamber ensembles, and voice. He also founded the remarkable field seminar “Composing in the Wilderness,” which he leads annually.

As a self-made specialist in music inspired by the U.S. National Parks, Stephen Lias has been Artist-in-Residence at Rocky Mountain, Glacier, Denali, Glacier Bay, and Gates of the Arctic National Parks, and has written over a dozen park-related pieces.

Many of these works will be featured on his forthcoming CD, Encounters: Music Inspired by Our National Parks, which I hope you’ll support on Kickstarter (I have!).

Last weekend I had an illuminating conversation with Stephen about many facets of his work: from the perspectives he has gained through his adventures in wild places, to the techniques he uses to capture and transform these wilderness experiences into music. Stephen spoke with me over Skype from Nacogdoches, Texas, where he is Professor of Composition at Stephen F. Austin State University. Continue reading

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Composing “Point Reyes from Chimney Rock”

Tom Killion, Point Reyes from Chimney Rock, 2011

Tom Killion, Point Reyes from Chimney Rock, 2011. Woodblock print. Courtesy of the artist.

My orchestral tone poem Point Reyes from Chimney Rock takes its title and inspiration from a woodblock print (above) by contemporary artist Tom Killion. This work reflects on a coastal landscape in Point Reyes National Seashore in the San Francisco Bay Area (where I was born and raised). It was commissioned by the NYU Symphony and premiered at the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts in New York City on March 3, 2014.

In the following reflection, I share some of what went into the creation this piece. My intention is certainly not to dictate how to listen to my music—you are free to form your own conclusions and derive your own meaning from it!—but to hopefully illuminate the compositional process, both for laypeople and for other composers who may be interested in how I approached writing music inspired by a landscape. Continue reading

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